Monthly Archives: November 2013

3 Principles for Making Your Time Spent in Meetings More Valuable

I have been thinking about the amount of time we spend in meetings at work, and how to increase that value. I looked at meeting time as if it were a product, and used marketing principles to increase meeting time’s value. Here is my philosophy on how you can make your time spent in meetings more valuable:

Make your available time scarcer.

  • Fill your calendar with the tasks you hope to accomplish.
  • Follow the lead of college professors; introduce your available time as your “office hours.”

Make your meeting presence more exclusive.

  • Restrict your attendance to certain types of meetings.
  • Restrict your attendance to smaller, more efficient meetings.

Make meetings you attend more effective.

  • Require x days notice on meetings.
  • Use the extra preparation time to come to meetings prepared with more information.

If you can use these principles to change your meeting experiences at work, and your organization allows you to do it, it’s worth a try. Do you have other suggestions? Leave a comment!

“Library” is NOT a Skill or Expertise, LinkedIn

Dear LinkedIn,

Library is not a skill or expertise.

Collection development? That’s an expertise. Information literacy? Sure, I guess that’s an expertise. Public speaking? Definitely. But library? And given my experience, many have endorsed me for it. Library is a place you work. Some would even say that library is a package of services your community or place of education can offer. But who would put library on their actual résumé as a skill? I suggest we stop endorsing each other for library as a skill on LinkedIn.

Do you agree or disagree with me?

You can read about more of the things that librarians care about at Library Science Daily. I publish it every morning.