Tag Archives: iOS

20 Questions Product Managers Should Ask about Mobile App Testing

I’ve worked as a product manager on several different types of mobile apps: Android, HTML5, iOS, phone, tablet…but always B2B. Building a new mobile app is a great experience. During testing, changes can be made very quickly to overcome weaknesses of the app.

The most challenging part of building mobile apps is building to the devices. Devices have limitations. Not everyone buys a new, high-priced phone or tablet every two years. Therefore, both the test plan and the project plan for a mobile app are dramatically different from a browser-based version of the same workflow. Product managers need to know the different scenarios in which the user runs the app, and they need to convey that information to the team. Below are some good questions to ask the team:

1. What are some ways we are testing security?

2. How are we testing with different screen sizes?

3. How are we testing the install and uninstall events?

4. Which carriers are we testing with?

5. Are we testing with no storage space available on the device?

6. Are we testing with low battery?

7. Are we testing with “dirty” devices (OS not upgraded, apps not upgraded, generally neglected)?

8. Are we testing with low-priced devices?


9. Are we testing with incoming calls?

10. Are we testing with the devices in different positions, alternating between portrait and landscape?

11. Are we testing with screen covers?

12. Are we testing with different pixel densities?

13. Are we testing using public Wi-Fi, maybe at Starbucks?

14. Are we testing with different screen brightness settings?

15. Are we testing whether we can walk and use the app?

16. Are we testing whether we can use just a thumb to use the app?


17. Are we testing with headphones plugged in to the device?

18. Have we looked at https://appthwack.com for automated testing?

19. Have we looked at http://www.perfectomobile.com for automated testing?

20. Why will people not like using this app?

 

I hope you enjoyed the post. Leave a comment on other questions to ask. For more activities for product management, read the Product Guy Daily. I publish it every morning.

Vine Offers Boundless Creativity for Libraries; Have You Heard?

Vine has been generating a great deal of buzz recently. The iOS app (owned by Twitter) has many users tinkering with the six second video capture see what it can do—both personally and professionally. We would be remiss if we did not mention actor Adam Goldberg, who has shown Vine users how powerful the app can really be (BlackBookMag.com has already crowned the actor ‘King of Vine’). Additionally, Turkish journalist Tulin Daloglu was able to use Vine to capture the aftermath of a terrorist attack on a US Embassy by a suicide bomber. These two instances of give us a great framework of possible use for the app in our communications both personally and professionally in either artistic or realist fashion.


 

So the questions is: how can libraries use Vine to their advantage? Are there libraries on Vine? Well, it doesn’t appear there are very many yet. Searching for libraries on Vine is quite a challenge. Luckily, most Vine users use their Twitter handles to create a Vine account, which makes it easier to track down users on Vine. However, since the technology is still new, there are not many libraries onboard.

 

Here is a list of libraries that are early adopters of Vine:

UCLA Powell Library — @UCLA_Powell
https://vine.co/v/brBgBDKIIet

The Mid Manhattan Library — @MidManhattanlib
https://vine.co/v/bJ3gTWrIHtZ

Topeka + Shawnee Public Library — @TopekaLibrary
https://vine.co/v/bJt25Kgezqp

SAMK Kirjasto (Satakunta University of Applied Sciences Library, Pori, Finland) — @SAMKlibrary
https://vine.co/v/bnQQ6xiBQW9

Falvey Library, Villanova University — @FalveyLibrary video posting in app; not shared to Twitter account

Brookline Library — @brklib
https://vine.co/v/bnEUZYKvVwh

Plymouth Libraries — @plymlibraries
https://vine.co/v/b1357QgKOhM

New York Institute of Technology Library — @NYITLibrary
https://vine.co/v/bvUxAuPbFZa

York Libraries — @YorkLibraries
https://vine.co/v/bJrWU2UdOUb

Lansdowne Public Library — @Lanspublibrary
https://vine.co/v/bruHhXbKdX6

Schaumburg Township District Library — @stdl
https://vine.co/v/b17je6Bl1DQ

 

Maybe these libraries have given you ideas of how to use Vine to reach patrons? These are the early stages of the app, and the potential is huge. Get on board and make something creative for your patrons!

 

I spent hours poring through Vine/Hootsuite Search Combinations/et cetera, so, I apologize if I have left out any libraries using Vine. Please post the details in the comments section so we can all see what you’re making!

Robert Mitchell is an MLIS candidate at the University of North Texas’ hybrid/distance based program that works in connection with the California State University, Northridge Library. Currently, he is a social media intern at UCLA Powell Library. He is interested in information systems, digital humanities, and digital libraries. He hopes to use social media and design to reach patrons and increase library relevancy. Follow him on Instagram and Twitter @RobertMitchellV and LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/robertbeatymitchell.

 

Mobile Optimization for Your Academic Library Website

First, a couple graphs on mobile usage from Mary Meeker…

 

Smart phones and tablets will soon become our primary personal computers.

Mobility strategy will be necessary for:

  • Catalog discovery
  • Library marketing
  • Student account management
  • Siri-like tools for finding things on campus

 

 

When links are close together, users hit the wrong links and become frustrated.

  • A reason to avoid lists of links

 

Don’t

  • Have items that patrons click right next to each other
  • Repurpose a mobile site design from a larger screen layout

 

Do

  • Design from scratch for the small screen sizes you wish to support
  • Use Responsive Web Design for library sites to minimize:
    • Resizing
    • Panning
    • Scrolling

 

Creating a mobile site design or a native mobile app will create a different user experience

  • Here are some examples…

Is USC successful?

 

 

Developing an Android native app:

  • It isn’t difficult to make an Android app
  • Android devices are not very standardized
  • Android apps tend to have a lot more bugs than equivalent iOS apps

Developing an iOS app:

  • Much easier to develop
  • Smaller share of the market

 

Other mobile technologies that academic libraries are beginning to use:

  • ILS-sent text messages about due dates/times, library events, etc.
  • Texting a call number/URL to a mobile device
  • Texting a librarian for reference questions
  • QR codes that send people to parts of the library website