Tag Archives: Marketing

40 Marketing Superstars to Follow on Twitter

I’ve compiled a list of marketing superstars that I follow on Twitter. Follow these people to stay current on marketing in 2013!

 

1. Pam Moore @PamMktgNut 50% mktg 50% geek, CEO entrepreneur social business strategist, speaker, author, lover of God Family Friends Beach & Life! Forbes TOP 10 Social Media Influencer · Orlando, FL · http://www.pammarketingnut.com

2. Shelly Kramer @ShellyKramer Marketing/brand strategist, idea generator, digital content magician, scribbler, information junkie. Luv MilkDuds+Beer. Member of Oversharers Anonymous. · Kansas City, MO · http://www.v3im.com

3. Kerry O’Shea Gorgone @KerryGorgone JD/MBA. Marketing Professor @fullsail. Speaker. Writer: @MarketingProfs, @smxplorer, {grow} blog, @HuffingtonPost, @entmagazine, @B2Community & more · Orlando, FL · huffingtonpost.com/kerry-oshea-gorgone

4. Ann Tran @AnnTran_ Social media consultant & travel & tech writer. Lover of nature & wine. Forbes Top10 Social Media Influencer.Verizon® #VZWBuzz
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ann-tran/  · Washington, D.C. · http://ann-tran.com/

5. CIO White Papers @CIOWhitePapers Free Industry White Papers and Reports in Cloud Computing, Business Intelligence, Social Media, CRM, ERP and Enterprise Marketing Technologies. · Los Angeles · http://ciowhitepapers.com

6. Rick Bakas @RickBakas Husband » Former NIKE brand guy » VP Mktg at Mobile Payments co. @PressPay » Sommelier » Founder of @BakasMedia » Obsessed w/ wine & food » Connector · Sonoma, CA · rickbakas.com/about-2

7. Brooke Griffin @BrookeGriffin_
#Business
#Marketing
#Inspiration Social Media Producer. Brand Strategist. Speaker | Music | Health | Fitness Fanatic | ‘Do What You Love~Excel at that.’ · San Diego + Los Angeles, CA · http://brookehgriffin.com/

8. Lori Taylor @lorirtaylor REV Media Marketing llc, You Bring The Rain, We Make It Pour. Mother of 5 & URL Junkie! #CEO
#Author
#SocialMedia
#Video
#Facebook
#Twitter Tips. · OH, NYC, CA · http://www.lorirtaylor.com

9. Michael R.H. Stewart @jerichotech Marketing futurist and Internet executive with over 21 years of broad experience in all aspects of online business, Social Media, and company management. · Scottsdale Arizona · http://www.jerichotechnology.com

10. Mike Allton @mike_allton Social Media and Internet Marketing consultant for small to medium businesses. Specialties include #SocialMedia, #Blogging, #SEO and #minestrone soup. · St. Louis, MO · http://www.TheSocialMediaHat.com

11. Ian Huckabee @WeejeeMedia Social strategist and technologist specializing in social media, learning and training. I’m a writer. As you feel your way along, feel good. · Chapel Hill / New York · http://weejeemedia.com

12. Rebekah Radice @RebekahRadice Social Media Marketing, Strategist, Branding, Blogger, Speaker, Trainer @BHGRealEstate | Coffee addict, sunshine lover & nuts about my 2 pups! · Los Angeles, CA · http://rebekahradice.com

13. Laura E. Pence @SocialSavvyGeek RVA Online Marketing Company specializing in Social Media! Conversation online. Savvy? · Richmond, VA, USA #RVA · http://SocialSavvyGeek.com

14. April Dunford @aprildunford Co-founder of RocketScope http://rocketscope.com  a marketing accelerator and analyst firm. Startup marketing blogger at RocketWatcher. · Toronto · http://rocketwatcher.com

15. Peter Collins @Peter_Collins_ | Years of IT as Techie and Management | Marketing and Communication | International Sportsman | Cooking and wine | fan of Keith Floyd | not Pink · United Kingdom · http://socialmediamarketeers.imrtl.com/

16. Megan Leap @MeganLeap Marketing Director @OMInstitute. Love tech, marketing, good food, great wine, running marathons, and Cavalier King Charles Spaniels. · South Florida/San Francisco · meganleap.com

17. Ann Handley @MarketingProfs Head of Content here at ‘Profs. People seem to like my writing: http://www.contentrulesbook.com 
http://www.annhandley.com  · Boston, Massachusetts · http://www.marketingprofs.com

18. William J. Ward @DR4WARD Social Media Professor in @NewhouseSU at @SyracuseU – Digital, Marketing, Advertising, Public Relations, Journalism, Higher Ed, Innovation, Creativity, Design · Syracuse, New York · http://www.DR4WARD.com

19. Dennis Shiao @dshiao Director, Product Marketing at @INXPO and #Author of a lead generation book (http://amzn.to/cqadOu ). Sharing (hopefully) useful info, one tweet at a time. · San Mateo, CA · http://allvirtual.me

20. Giles Farrow @SmartSoftMarket Helping Software Companies and Startups improve their Marketing. Tweets on #ProdMktg
#Startup
#Software
#Marketing. http://smartsoftwaremarketing.co.uk/ · West Sussex, UK · http://smartsoftwaremarketing.co.uk/

21. Carol Phillips @carol_phillips Notre Dame Marketing professor; Brand strategist; President independent market research & consulting firm, Brand Amplitude; #Millennials are my passion. · Michigan · http://www.brandamplitude.com

22. SEO.com @seocom Want to rank better in Google? Check out our services. Follow us for the best information about SEO, SEM and inbound marketing. Tweets by @Bebabz · Utah · http://www.seo.com

23. Beverly Macy @BeverlyMacy
#SMMUCLA 310-860-4788; beverlymacy at gmail; Blog @HuffPo; Author: The Power of Real-Time Social Media Marketing; Business Meets the Power of Social Media · Los Angeles, CA 90210 · http://www.gravitysummit.com

24. Bri Clark @Bri_Clark
#realtimesocialghoster
#marketingstrategist, owner of @belleconsult, #speaker, #author, #sassoligist, #belletip, #socialmediamarketor
#blogger
#strategist · Boise ID · http://briclarkthebelleofboise.blogspot.com

25. You Brand @YouBrandInc You have business challenges, we have answers. We help you achieve business breakthroughs and amplify it with digital marketing. · Minneapolis · http://www.youbrandinc.com

26. Joshua Duncan @joshua_d Tech marketing, busy dad, most likely hungry. Director of Product Management and Marketing @NoesisEnergy. · Austin, TX · http://www.arandomjog.com/

27. Carol Lynn Rivera @CarolLynnRivera Editor of Web.Search.Social. Business owner, collector of interesting people. Let’s talk marketing, books, food, inspiration and other delicious things. · Holmdel, NJ · http://www.websearchsocial.com

28. Bethany Simpson @bethanysimpson LA marketing director and video host with equal interest in creativity and logic / http://imediaconnection.com · Los Angeles

29. Pamela Konstantakis @pamelakonst Marketer, social media enthusiast, fashionista, dog lover, PSU Alum · USA

30. Christian Wig @christianwig Business and technology strategies, innovation and entrepreneurship. Combining #entarch and #businessmodel to prepare a #bizarch for the unknown. · Oslo · http://christianwig.com/about.html

31. Andrea Moe @AndreaMoe ENTP, dog lover, iPhone & iPad addict, experimental cocktail mixer, football chick, mother of a teenager, OH! and I do a little product managing and marketing · Atlanta

32. Peter McCarthy @petermccarthy Founder and Principal Consultant, McCarthy Digital. Working at the intersection of publishing, technology, and marketing. · Croton-on-Hudson, NY · http://www.mccarthy-digital.com

33. Ubaid Saleem @Ubaid_Saleem Digital executive. Tweets abt Product Mgmt, Strategy, Customer Exp, Innovation, Leadership, Management & Marketing. Love tech, gadgets & SciFi. Opinions my own. · Northern Virginia

34. Jennifer Doctor @jidoctor Passionate experienced Product Marketing & Management leader … & lifelong Red Sox fan! (Views expressed are mine.) · Delray Beach, FL · http://www.outsideinview.com

35. Steve Rotter @sjrotter Entrepreneur, Evangelist, Author, Family Man, & VP Marketing @brightcove. Fascinated by great marketing, data visualization and building digital brands.

36. Sally Duda @SallyOutLoud Marketing Operations Manager; coffee lover; wannabe singer; thinks out loud. · Greater Philadelphia Area

37. Noelene Mostert @NoeleneMostert Marketing Manager @quirkagency, wine diva, rugby fanatic, baking enthusiast, closet tree hugger and digitally curious in general. Follow me! · Johannesburg

38. Keith Hamrick @keithremarks Product #Marketing Manager @SAP. Excited by the #extreme, fascinated by the #mysterious. Passionate about #technology. Avid #triathlete. Tweets are mine. · San Francisco

39. Mathieu Hannouz @repackaged Technology is good. Understanding customers is better. Specifying biz cases that drive value is best! This is what I do. Sr Product/Marketing Manager @neolane · Boston, MA · http://about.me/repackaged

40. Tom Evans @compellingpm Helping companies identify compelling market opportunities, create compelling products and define compelling go-to-market strategies. · Austin, TX · compellingpm.com

 

Who else should people follow? Leave a comment!

13 Factors to Consider in Adopting New Customer-Facing Products and Services

I’ve been looking at what organizations should consider when adopting new technological solutions, and it got me thinking. Which factors need to be considered in the research and implementation of new customer-facing products and services? Here is a checklist that you can go through during your evaluation of new technologies:

 

Security

  • Will new products and services pose any risk to data security? If a user were to log in and have her personal information compromised, this would be a disaster!

Stability

  • Will new technology solutions have outages? Many of today’s technologies are “up” for less than 99% of the time. Is this acceptable? Is there something else that users can use if the solution goes down?
  • And will they strain other technologies we use? Some software types “sit on top of” existing systems and occasionally cause them to go down.

Performance

  • Consider the performance for the product or service. Will users feel it is dramatically slower than Google or Amazon?

Functionality

  • Are the features going to be there on Day 1 or will users experience iterations to get to full functionality?
  • Is there broken functionality in the product or service? Ownership: whose problem is it to fix? Accountability: to what extent is it our throat that is going to get choked when there is a problem?
  • One-size-fits-all and one-search-fits-all: should search software work out of the box for 60% of users or 99% of users? Specialists may be alienated if the general search tool is optimized for laypeople (and vice versa).

UX

  • Is a new technology-based product or service going to change the UX of other services? Major changes to your online presence have major implications for users. Even changes that are seen as very positive by most will frustrate some.
  • For a potential product or service, at what point will UX assessment be possible? Can you do UX assessment before making a large investment in resources?
  • Will the UX for mobile users change?
  • Redesigning the user interface to incorporate a new product or service is risky, and most organizations avoid drastic changes. Look at the CNN redesign model…

2000:

2003:

2008:

2011:

2013:

Impact on employees

  • What will new technology mean for existing employees’ job responsibilities? Is there currently expertise in the organization or will new positions be required? For those affected, will their other job responsibilities be lessened or changed?

Collaboration

  • Will the implementation of new products and services open doors for collaboration with other organizations? Could nearby organizations share costs with us? Do we want to work with those guys?

Resource usage patterns

  • Will new products and services change the current usage of your organization’s resources? Will end users incur the extra costs?

Hosting

  • Where does new technology live? The days of organizations having to buy/lease/maintain servers are coming to an end. Software companies offer SaaS solutions. Cloud companies like AWS can cheaply offer huge amounts of virtualized space. Due to cloud computing, initial development investments can be $$$, instead of $$$$.

Organizational priorities

  • How do potential new products and services address your organization’s priorities?
  • What is a new technology’s impact on ideal of being green? Is there a reduction in data usage? Does the fact that someone else is hosting it make it green?

Sustainability

  • Will new technologies remain sustainable? Sure, we can afford to have them now, but what about ten years from now? If organizational priorities change in a few years, will we still be locked into supporting the product or service?

Scalability

  • Will new technologies be scalable as usage grows?
  • Will new technologies be scalable as the organization grows?

Getting the word out

  • So let’s say we did implement a new technology-based product or service…how would we tell people about it? What is the marketing strategy?

 

What other factors should an organization consider? Leave a comment!

Vine Offers Boundless Creativity for Libraries; Have You Heard?

Vine has been generating a great deal of buzz recently. The iOS app (owned by Twitter) has many users tinkering with the six second video capture see what it can do—both personally and professionally. We would be remiss if we did not mention actor Adam Goldberg, who has shown Vine users how powerful the app can really be (BlackBookMag.com has already crowned the actor ‘King of Vine’). Additionally, Turkish journalist Tulin Daloglu was able to use Vine to capture the aftermath of a terrorist attack on a US Embassy by a suicide bomber. These two instances of give us a great framework of possible use for the app in our communications both personally and professionally in either artistic or realist fashion.


 

So the questions is: how can libraries use Vine to their advantage? Are there libraries on Vine? Well, it doesn’t appear there are very many yet. Searching for libraries on Vine is quite a challenge. Luckily, most Vine users use their Twitter handles to create a Vine account, which makes it easier to track down users on Vine. However, since the technology is still new, there are not many libraries onboard.

 

Here is a list of libraries that are early adopters of Vine:

UCLA Powell Library — @UCLA_Powell
https://vine.co/v/brBgBDKIIet

The Mid Manhattan Library — @MidManhattanlib
https://vine.co/v/bJ3gTWrIHtZ

Topeka + Shawnee Public Library — @TopekaLibrary
https://vine.co/v/bJt25Kgezqp

SAMK Kirjasto (Satakunta University of Applied Sciences Library, Pori, Finland) — @SAMKlibrary
https://vine.co/v/bnQQ6xiBQW9

Falvey Library, Villanova University — @FalveyLibrary video posting in app; not shared to Twitter account

Brookline Library — @brklib
https://vine.co/v/bnEUZYKvVwh

Plymouth Libraries — @plymlibraries
https://vine.co/v/b1357QgKOhM

New York Institute of Technology Library — @NYITLibrary
https://vine.co/v/bvUxAuPbFZa

York Libraries — @YorkLibraries
https://vine.co/v/bJrWU2UdOUb

Lansdowne Public Library — @Lanspublibrary
https://vine.co/v/bruHhXbKdX6

Schaumburg Township District Library — @stdl
https://vine.co/v/b17je6Bl1DQ

 

Maybe these libraries have given you ideas of how to use Vine to reach patrons? These are the early stages of the app, and the potential is huge. Get on board and make something creative for your patrons!

 

I spent hours poring through Vine/Hootsuite Search Combinations/et cetera, so, I apologize if I have left out any libraries using Vine. Please post the details in the comments section so we can all see what you’re making!

Robert Mitchell is an MLIS candidate at the University of North Texas’ hybrid/distance based program that works in connection with the California State University, Northridge Library. Currently, he is a social media intern at UCLA Powell Library. He is interested in information systems, digital humanities, and digital libraries. He hopes to use social media and design to reach patrons and increase library relevancy. Follow him on Instagram and Twitter @RobertMitchellV and LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/robertbeatymitchell.

 

12 Signs that the Product You’re Hearing about is Vaporware

No one wants to announce vaporware. It’s an act of desperation, probably stemming from poor long-range planning. It happens in all industries, and even occasionally in politics. When a company rep is telling you about a product that is coming in the next year, it’s a good idea to be skeptical. It may never come out, or the date may slide. The motive might be for you to wait for that product or feature, instead of moving to a competitor’s product like a lot of other folks. During an industry event, you might be surprised at how much vaporware is being announced. Here are some signs that a product is vaporware:

  1. The details of the product have changed. You first heard it was a product that integrated with Product B, and now it integrates with Product C. Or the name of the product has changed. Red flags!
  2. The scope of the product has decreased over time. The first time you heard about it, the product did A, B, and C. Now you’re hearing it does A, D, and E.
  3. Buzzwords. Cloud computing, virtualization, business intelligence, big data, data mining, de-dupe, and 4G/5G. There is no bigger buzzword in the software industry than “the Cloud.” Ask Paul Christman what he thinks about buzzwords.
  4. The company is losing customers left and right to existing products that compete with this product. The company is desperate to keep you from leaving them, too. If you were the company, wouldn’t you make promises to keep the customer?
  5. “We’ll change your industry with this product.” Don’t believe it until this announcement: “Today we change your industry with this product.”
  6. The way the company representative demoed the product to you was through a PowerPoint or PDF. No live demo? Why wasn’t it possible?
  7. There’s a surprising amount of leeway on price. Is this product being discounted significantly on a pre-order?
  8. They say that you can pre-order, yet none of the solutions they’re pitching to you today are available today. Hmm…are you an easy mark for this company?
  9. The company hasn’t produced a new product in a long time. The point here is not about company size…it’s about how companies that don’t release new products a lot forget how. Releasing a new product is HARD.
  10. There are press releases dating back more than a year. Is it normal for a company in your industry to announce things more than a year before they are released? For most industries, the answer is no.
  11. All the information you find on the product is word-for-word from press releases. Either the press releases are really, really good (like the ones from SalesForce) or the press in your industry is not being skeptical. Google is your friend to find this.
  12. The press/bloggers in your industry rarely call companies on their BS. Who is the watchdog who would tell you that this product is never going to be delivered? Are they really out there doing that or are they a puppet for the company, copying their press releases word-for-word?

Maybe YOU should be your industry’s watchdog! Go to industry events and make a note of products that you’re told are coming in the next year. A year later, publish/blog a list of the ones that have and haven’t arrived.

Don’t let the companies in your industry get away with being all hat and no cattle…

How to Promote Your Product with an Exclusive Twitter Handle

Hierarchy

Have the company Twitter account retweet the product handle’s most important tweets. Your company has a Twitter account, and the company has several major products. A great setup is to have the company Twitter handle retweet from the product Twitter handles. It definitely puts less pressure on the person tweeting the company handle. The assigned product manager is a natural for overseeing the product Twitter handle. See what Nike does:

For your product Twitter handle, get a spiffy background with the product logo. Do some product marketing. Hopefully, you have a graphic designer to help with this.

Communication

Have a pathway for followers to get customer service & sales info without tweeting. Getting customer support problems sent to your handle is not ideal. You’ll want to have a place to redirect them; maybe a webpage form. Some companies have Twitter handles that specifically deal with customer support problems. A product Twitter handle probably shouldn’t be filled with tweets that say you’re sorry about a problem a customer in Omaha is having.

Have live Twitter chat events. Have an event that lasts one hour, and allow customers to ask anything. You’ll want to have a couple people do the tweeting, just in case the questions get too hard or too numerous. If your product is international, try to vary the times for the chat events.

Live-tweet during trade shows & industry events. This will give your product handle maximum exposure.

Exclusive to social media

Make exclusive offers. Potentially boosting revenue is the way you justify this to your company, but this also gives your followers the idea that they are getting a super-secret deal. You’re making the customer feel like an insider. The offer doesn’t have to be a fire sale; it can be the same basic deal you’re offering everyone. Call it exclusive and you’ll be surprised who responds.

Promote the blog on Twitter & have the blog promote the Twitter handle. Having trouble coming up with the next blog post? Do one on the new Twitter page.

Promote Facebook on Twitter & have Facebook promote the Twitter handle. Your company may be stronger on Facebook than Twitter, so try to pollinate one account with the other.

Following & interacting

Follow your customers & potential customers. This can take a while to compile. You’re trying to build engagement, so this is a really good strategy.

Don’t follow your competitors. This is a bush league move. Follow your competitors on another account that isn’t the face of your brand.

Follow & interact with customers of the competitors. This can be fun. Just look at your competitors’ followers and follow them.

Follow & interact with the press & bloggers. A great way to stay in the minds of these folks is to build a Twitter relationship. Amp up your activity with them around industry events. Leading to my last point…

Follow & interact with trade shows & industry organizations. Get an early start with trade show Twitter handles, and stay active with the industry organizations.

 

For more information on product management, product marketing, social media, etc., read the Product Guy Daily. I publish it every morning. Do you have other tips and tricks? Leave a comment!

How 12 Leading Public Libraries Are Handling Patrons with New E-Readers after Christmas

I read a few articles on the fact that public libraries were bracing for a lot of patrons with new Christmas e-readers, but I wasn’t really seeing the specifics. Via social media, I asked several public libraries how they would handle patrons with new e-readers after Christmas (#eReaderXmas). Here is what I found:

 

Norwalk Public Library in Fairfield County, CT answered that they were having two classes on 12/29: one for Kindle and one for Apple devices.

DC Public Library in Washington, DC answered that they had tutorials, guides, and a plethora of information on what is available.

Spokane County Library District in Spokane County, Washington has extra staff for the holiday week and has scheduled e-book classes in January.

Kitchener Public Library in Kitchener, Ontario holds clinics. These include a holiday clinic, plus monthly clinics year-round. Last year’s holiday clinic had 85 people in attendance. KPL’s online presence for e-readers is impressive. See more here:

The Enoch Pratt Free Library, the public library system of Baltimore City, has a large marketing campaign to promote its e-library.

New York Public Library has a ton of programming: http://www.nypl.org/events/calendar?keyword=Ebook. 116 classes are scheduled:

San Francisco Public Library has 26 e-reader classes on its calendar:

The Sacramento Public Library in Sacramento, CA provides one-on-one technical help available and scheduled e-reader programming. Additionally, Sacramento Public Library is now offering 3M and OverDrive.

Berkeley Public Library in Berkeley, CA provides support for popular e-readers, and the e-book provider held a seminar to discuss the new technology.

The Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County in Cincinnati, OH has hands-on workshops and e-reader “petting zoos.” Cincinnati has done great marketing on this. See more at http://www.cincinnatilibrary.org/news/2012/ereadersholidays.html:

Dallas Public Library in Dallas, TX has staff to help in all 28 locations, and they’ve purchased hundreds of titles specifically for e-readers.

Queens Library in Queens, New York City offers free classes all year on how to download free e-books and apps and use e-readers.

 

You can read about other things that these important libraries are doing at Library Science Daily. I publish it every morning (even on holidays).

 

Did I fail to mention your public library e-reader program? Leave a comment!

Libraries Help Stressed Students during Finals

In the fall semester of 2012, I asked some academic libraries what they were doing for stressed students during finals (#libsduringfinals). Here are some of the things I found:

  • UCLA Library had four libraries participate in finals activities like a stress-busters program, therapy dogs, origami, yoga, chair massage, Xbox gaming, and meditation.
  • UNC University Libraries had therapy dogs, free coffee, meditation, snacks, free tea, and crafting. Read more here.
  • University of Central Florida Libraries had an event called Kram for the Exam, with late hours, free study supplies, snacks, and t-shirts. Extended hours were posted on their blog. The libraries set aside computers for student use, as well. The coffee shop was also open late.
  • Wake Forest University’s Z. Smith Reynolds Library had coffee around the clock, plus midnight snacks. They called it Wake the Library. Nice branding!
  • Cornell University Library installed a lawn in the library. It started with a heavy tarp to protect the floor, and sod was placed on top of the tarp. Additionally, a basket of food in the lawn area was replenished for students. The students used the lawn as a study area. Read more at Library Journal.
  • The University of Texas Libraries had a therapy dog study break, plus a display in front of the library on available campus resources.
  • The University of Illinois Undergraduate Library had therapy dogs.
  • University at Buffalo Libraries brought in therapy dogs.
  • Appalachian State University’s Belk Library and Information Commons had a visit from Bailey the therapy dog.
  • Queens University of Charlotte’s Everett Library brought in therapy dogs. Watch a video here!
  • University of Iowa Libraries had a program called Pet a Dog and Study On.
  • Emory Libraries’ Robert W. Woodruff Library had visits from therapy dogs. Read about it here.
  • MIT Libraries had extended hours, therapy dogs, and more.
  • NCSU Libraries brought in free late night coffee and doughnuts.
  • UC Santa Barbara Library, as part of its efforts, had the Cookie Monster drop by.
  • Boise State University’s Albertsons Library was open 24 hours. BSU focused heavily on safety, with the CARE program.
  • Samford University Library kept a close watch over social media in order to respond to questions and comments from students. Also, the librarians sent out encouraging pictures of kittens to students.
  • Library of St. Ambrose University stayed open late.
  • LMU’s William H. Hannon Library
    has a fireplace, which made students happy.

 

Academic libraries are devoting resources to finals activities. Therapy dogs seem to be a popular initiative, but look at what UCLA, UNC, and UCF did for finals…it’s very impressive. Additionally, these libraries are blogging about the activities and using their finals periods as marketing opportunities.

 

What else did libraries do for students during finals? Leave a comment!